What’s New at Bradford Blog


Tuesday May 3rd, 2022

Spring is in the Air.

Here are some books that fill like springtime.

Spring by Ali Smith. What unites Katherine Mansfield, Charlie Chaplin, Shakespeare, Rilke, Beethoven, Brexit, the present, the past, the north, the south, the east, the west, a man mourning lost times, a woman trapped in modern times? Spring. The great connective. With an eye to the migrancy of story over time and riffing on Pericles, one of Shakespeare’s most resistant and rollicking works, Ali Smith tell the impossible tale of an impossible time. In a time of walls and lockdown, Smith opens the door. The time we’re living in is changing nature. Will it change the nature of story? Hope springs eternal.

 

Lock and Luck by Jenna Evans Welch. In Ireland for a wedding, Addie hopes to move past something she did that has left her miserable and threatens her future, but her brother Ian isn’t letting her forget, a situation that is transformed by a road trip and an unusual travel guidebook.

 

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. The novel follows the character development of Elizabeth Bennet, the dynamic protagonist of the book who learns about the repercussions of hasty judgments and comes to appreciate the difference between superficial goodness and actual goodness. Mr. Bennet, owner of the Longbourn estate in Hertfordshire, has five daughters, but his property is entailed and can only be passed to a male heir. His wife also lacks an inheritance, so his family faces becoming very poor upon his death. Thus, it is imperative that at least one of the girls marry well to support the others, which is a motivation that drives the plot.

 

Lilac Girls by Martha Hall Kelly. On a September day in Manhattan in 1939, twenty-something Caroline Ferriday is consumed by her efforts to secure the perfect boutonniere for an important French diplomat and resisting the romantic advances of a married actor. Meanwhile across the Atlantic, Kasia Kuzmerick, a Polish Catholic teenager, is nervously anticipating the changes that are sure to come since Germany has declared war on Poland. As tensions rise abroad – and in her personal life – Caroline’s interest in aiding the war effort in France grows and she eventually comes to hear about the dire situation at the Ravensbruck all-female concentration camp. At the same time, Kasia’s carefree youth is quickly slipping away, only to be replaced by a fervor for the Polish resistance movement. Through Ravensbruck – and the horrific atrocities taking place there told in part by an infamous German surgeon, Herta Oberheuser – the two women’s lives will converge in unprecedented ways and a novel of redemption and hope emerges that is breathtaking in scope and depth

 

Middlemarch by George Eliot (Mary Anne Evans). Set in Middlemarch, a fictional English Midland town, in 1829 to 1832, it follows distinct, intersecting stories with many characters. Issues include the status of women, the nature of marriage, idealism, self-interest, religion, hypocrisy, political reform, and education. Despite comic elements, Middlemarch uses realism to encompass historical events: the 1832 Reform Act, early railways, and the accession of King William IV.

 

May is the month to Celebrate mothers!

If you are following along with the reading challenge this month’s book is about moms. Here are some recommendations to celebrate moms!

The Perfect Mother by Aimee Molloy. An addictive psychological thriller about a group of women whose lives become unexpectedly connected when one of their newborns goes missing.

Mrs Fletcher by Tom Perrotta. A forty-six-year-old divorcee whose beloved only child has just left for college, Eve Fletcher is struggling to adjust to her empty nest. One night she receives a text from an anonymous number that says, “U R my MILF!” Over the months that follow, that message comes to obsess Eve.

 

The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan. Four mothers, four daughters, four families whose histories shift with the four winds depending on who’s “saying” the stories. In 1949 four Chinese women, recent immigrants to San Francisco, begin meeting to eat dim sum, play mahjong, and talk. United in shared unspeakable loss and hope, they call themselves the Joy Luck Club. Rather than sink into tragedy, they choose to gather to raise their spirits and money. “To despair was to wish back for something already lost. Or to prolong what was already unbearable.” Forty years later the stories and history continue.

 

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng. In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is planned—from the layout of the winding roads, to the colors of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules.Enter Mia Warren—an enigmatic artist and single mother—who arrives in this idyllic bubble with her teenaged daughter Pearl, and rents a house from the Richardsons. Soon Mia and Pearl become more than tenants: all four Richardson children are drawn to the mother-daughter pair. But Mia carries with her a mysterious past and a disregard for the status quo that threatens to upend this carefully ordered community.

HAPPY READING!

 

Friday April 1st, 2022

The Book Challenge this month is APRIL SHOWERS or something with “Rain” in the title. Here are a few recommendations to get your feet wet.

Dinah Taylor has an orderly life that is just how she likes it. A perfectly furnished luxury apartment, a satisfying career as a scientist and CEO of her own company, and an uncomplicated personal life. But all of that changes when she meets seven-year-old Jonah. The boy shows up one day, a scruffy dog by his side, in front of her office building. Dinah knows nothing about kids and even less about animals, but after she buys him breakfast, he shows up the next day…and the next. She tries to learn more about him, to help him, but he’s remarkably skilled at evading her questions

 

In the title novella of this collection, Burt Crownover causes quite a stir when he steals into Rain Valley in the middle of the night. It’s no surprise the ranchers are suspicious. They’ve got a herd of highly valuable cattle and any stranger could be a thief. But is Burt a rustler out to con them, or just the man they need to help protect their stock?

 

One beautiful summer afternoon, Jody Linder receives shocking news: The man convicted of murdering her father is being released from prison and returning to the small town of Rose, Kansas. It has been twenty-three years since that stormy night when her father was shot and killed and her mother disappeared, presumed dead. Neither the protective embrace of Jody’s three uncles nor the safe haven of her grandparents’ ranch could erase the pain caused by Billy Crosby on that catastrophic night.

Danielle Monroe is determined to use her new job in DC as a stepping-stone to a high-powered political career. But the secrets surrounding her father’s death continue to overshadow her goals. Her family thinks she holds the final piece of the puzzle, but she doesn’t even know what the puzzle is…until an attractive and possibly dangerous stranger shows up in her life. Patrick Kane is searching for answers about his own dark tragedy, not realizing that the beautiful Danielle may not just hold the key to his mystery but also his heart. They have to stay alive long enough to find out.

Happy Reading! 

 

Monday March 7th, 2022

March is Irish Authors month. For those who are following along with the Book Challenge here are recommendations for you.

A Week in Winter was Maeve Binchy’s last novel before she died in 2012. Binchy takes her readers to Stoneybridge village in Ireland, the hometown of the female protagonist, Chicky Starr. Chicky opens up a holiday hotel as a safe haven for guests and natives. The heartwarming story introduces all the beloved characters and townsfolk who help to make Chicky’s dreams turn into a reality. Binchy wrote 16 novels in total, all known for their warmth.

 

Dubliners by James Joyce. James Joyce’s short story collection brings Dublin to life. Start with “The Dead,” the longest story in the book and arguably James’s most famous. It’s about a husband and wife going to a party on a snowy evening, and so much more.

 

Brooklyn by Colm Tóibín. Colm Tóibín’s sixth novel takes place after World War II. It traces the story of Eilis Lacey, a young working-class woman who moves by herself from Ireland to Brooklyn in search of a better life and career opportunity. The coming-of-age story was adapted into a 2015 film, starring Saoirse Ronan and Emory Cohen.

 

Winner of the 2018 Booker Prize, Milkman is set amid the Troubles in 1970s Northern Ireland—although the narrator never directly names the tension erupting in violence all around her. None of the characters are named, either. The effect of all this is a book steeped in fear. The action begins when the 18-year-old middle sister attracts the unwanted attention of a senior paramilitary figure known only as the milkman, and is forced into a position of danger.

 

Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt. In this touching memoir, Frank McCourt recounts his early childhood growing up in both Brooklyn and Limerick, Ireland. Almost written like a lyrical essay, McCourt discusses everything from poverty to living with a neglectful and alcoholic father. The book won a Pulitzer Prize in 1997 in the autobiography category.

 

March is also Women’s History Month. If Irish authors aren’t your thing here a few recommendations on women’s history!

Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World. Women inventors and scientists are not discussed that much in the news, but the immense contribution of female innovators in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) is something every generation must be aware of. And this book offers you just that. Written by New York Times Bestselling author Rachel Ignotofsky, Women in Science talks about 50 female scientists whose efforts shaped the technological capabilities achieved by humanity.

Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls: 100 Tales of Extraordinary Women. If you want to educate your children about women’s role in strengthening our society, culture, and economy, this book is the best gift you can give them this Women’s History Month. Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls is a collection of 100 inspiring stories from the lives of great women from both past and present. From Frida Kahlo to Marie Curie and Michelle Obama, the book features stories of 100 courageous female leaders, scientists, artists, lawyers, etc., whose stories are worth telling. Written by Italian authors Francesca Cavallo and Elena Favilli, this New York Times bestseller also contains illustrations from 60 female artists from across the globe.

 

Jane Eyre. A classic Women’s History Month book that presents the story of a brave female survivor named Jane who grew up as an orphan and faced extreme cruelty and injustice. Yet she manages to emerge as a strong and spirited independent woman by following her conviction. This heart-throbbing novel was written by English writer Charlotte Brontë and although it was published in the year 1847, Jane’s story is relevant even today because of the way it realistically depicts a women’s emotions while she struggles for finding purpose and love in her life.

 

 

 

 

Happy Reading!!

 

 

Thursday, February 3, 2022

Love is in the Air.

As we are moving through the seasons and moving through our Book Challenges, this month’s challenge is Romantic Comedies.

Here are some fun suggestions to help you hit your challenge this month!

My Not So Perfect Life by Sophie Kinsella

When Katie Brenner is fired from her dream job in advertising in London, she’s desperate to get away from her mad boss Demeter, and her crush, Alex, who she thought shared her feelings of adoration but didn’t. Seeking refuge, she goes home to her father’s farm in Somerset to help make her stepmother’s dream of turning their land into a glamping retreat come true. Applying her savvy marketing smarts, Katie masterminds a glamorous upscale resort. But when Demeter shows up unannounced, with Alex not far behind, Katie is forced to rethink her revenge fantasies and her assumptions about family, love, and office politics and realize how much she may have misjudged everyone–and everything–around her

A Love Unexpected by Leah Brunner

My one and only goal has always been to make it to Congress. I’ve got it all: the looks, the brains, the connections. Except I missed one glaring requirement: a wife. The conservative voters of Kansas don’t trust an unmarried man. Which means I need a bride. Immediately. The lovely Odette Hastings seems to fit the bill. She’s a wholesome small-town girl, and most importantly, in need of cash. I’ll give her the money to take care of her elderly parents, and she’ll be the political arm candy I need. The only problem is Odette is a little too beautiful, a little too intelligent, and much too distracting. I have to keep my eye on the prize. Even when I’m starting to think there might be something I’d rather have more.

 

For those of you that are following along with our Book Club here at the library. This month’s book is

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros. It is also the NEA Big Read: Wichita book.  

Told in a series of vignettes – sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes deeply joyous – it is the story of a young Latina girl growing up in Chicago, inventing for herself who and what she will become. Few other books in our time have touched so many readers.

If you have already finished The House on Mango Street and wanted try your hands at something similar, here are few suggestions for you.

The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo

When Xiomara Batista, who pours all her frustrations and passion into poetry, is invited to join the school slam poetry club, she struggles with her mother’s expectations and her need to be heard.

Love in English by Maria Andreu

Feeling blocked after moving from Argentina to New Jersey, a sixteen-year-old poet finds herself torn between a cute American boy in her math class and a Greek student who understands the struggles she is facing in an ESL class.

 

Happy Reading! 

 

Wednesday, October 13, 2021

Here are some new books that look like they could make for some spooky, or at least magical, reading for your October. Click on the title or cover to read more about them and to place your holds!

My Sweet Girl by Amanda Jayatissa

 

The Last House on Needless Street by Catriona Ward

 

Certain Dark Things by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

 

Small Town Monsters by Diana Rodriguez Wallach

 

Wildwood Whispers by Willa Reece

 

Apples Never Fall by Liane Moriarty

 

 

The Night She Disappeared by Lisa Jewell

 

 

The Ghost Tracks by Celso Hurtado

 

Ferryman by Claire McFall

 

Time Will Tell by Barry Lyga

 

Mrs. Claus and the Halloween Homicide by Liz Ireland

 

 

Happy Halloween Reading!

 

 

Thursday, July 8, 2021

Our Bradford Challenge category this month is Memoir! Here you can find some memoir books that are fairly new on our shelves to tick off that challenge if you are playing along. Even if not, it looks like some mighty interesting reading! 

*descriptions come from Amazon

**click on the cover or title to reserve your copy

 

 

The Anthropocene Reviewed: Essays on a Human-Centered Planet by John Green

The Anthropocene is the current geologic age, in which humans have profoundly reshaped the planet and its biodiversity. In this remarkable symphony of essays adapted and expanded from his groundbreaking podcast, bestselling author John Green reviews different facets of the human-centered planet on a five-star scale—from the QWERTY keyboard and sunsets to Canada geese and Penguins of Madagascar.

Funny, complex, and rich with detail, the reviews chart the contradictions of contemporary humanity. As a species, we are both far too powerful and not nearly powerful enough, a paradox that came into sharp focus as we faced a global pandemic that both separated us and bound us together.

John Green’s gift for storytelling shines throughout this masterful collection. The Anthropocene Reviewed is a open-hearted exploration of the paths we forge and an unironic celebration of falling in love with the world.

 

 

Bamboozled by Jesus: How God Tricked Me Into the Life of My Dreams by Yvonne Orji

Yvonne Orji has never shied away from being unapologetically herself, and that includes being outspoken about her faith. Known for interpreting Biblical stories and metaphors to fit current times, her humorous and accessible approach to faith leaves even non-believers inspired and wanting more.

The way Yvonne sees it, God is a Sovereign Prankster, punking folks long before Ashton Kutcher made it cool. When she meditates on her own life—complete with unforeseen blessings and unanticipated roadblocks—she realizes it’s one big testimony to how God tricked her into living out her wildest dreams. And she wants us to join in on getting bamboozled. This is not a Self-Help book—it’s a Get Yours book!

 

 

Running Out: In Search of Water on the High Plains by Lucas Bessire

Anthropologist Lucas Bessire journeyed back to western Kansas, where five generations of his family lived as irrigation farmers and ranchers, to try to make sense of this vital resource and its loss. His search for water across the drying High Plains brings the reader face to face with the stark realities of industrial agriculture, eroding democratic norms, and surreal interpretations of a looming disaster. Yet the destination is far from predictable, as the book seeks to move beyond the words and genres through which destruction is often known. Instead, this journey into the morass of eradication offers a series of unexpected discoveries about what it means to inherit the troubled legacies of the past and how we can take responsibility for a more inclusive, sustainable future.

An urgent and unsettling meditation on environmental change, Running Out is a revelatory account of family, complicity, loss, and what it means to find your way back home.

 

 

The Gran Tour: Travels with My Elders by Ben Aitken

One millennial, six bus trips, one big generation gap.

When Ben Aitken learnt that his gran had enjoyed a four-night holiday including four three-course dinners, four cooked breakfasts, four games of bingo, a pair of excursions, sixteen pints of lager and luxury return coach travel, all for a hundred pounds, he thought, that’s the life, and signed himself up. Six times over.

Good value aside, what Ben was really after was the company of his elders – those with more chapters under their belt, with the wisdom granted by experience, the candour gifted by time, and the hard-earned ability to live each day like it’s nearly their last.

A series of bus holidays ensued – from Scarborough to St Ives, Killarney to Lake Como – during which Ben attempts to shake off his thirty-something blues by getting old as soon as possible.

 

 

Second Thoughts: On Having and Being a Second Child by Lynn Berger

A lovely, searching meditation on second children―on whether to have one and what it means to be one―that seamlessly weaves pieces of art and culture on the topic with scientific research and personal anecdotes

The decision to have more than one child is at least as consuming as the decision to have a child at all―and yet for all the good books that deliberate on the choice of becoming a parent, there is far less writing on the choice of becoming a parent of two, and all the questions that arise during the process. Is there any truth in the idea of character informed by birth order, or the loneliness of only children? What is the reality of sibling rivalry? What might a parent to one, or two, come to regret?

 

 

The Secret to Superhuman Strength by Alison Bechdel

Comics and cultural superstar Alison Bechdel delivers a deeply layered story of her fascination, from childhood to adulthood, with every fitness craze to come down the pike: from Jack LaLanne in the 60s (“Outlandish jumpsuit! Cantaloupe-sized guns!”) to the existential oddness of present-day spin class. Readers will see their athletic or semi-active pasts flash before their eyes through an ever-evolving panoply of running shoes, bicycles, skis, and sundry other gear. But the more Bechdel tries to improve herself, the more her self appears to be the thing in her way. She turns for enlightenment to Eastern philosophers and literary figures, including Beat writer Jack Kerouac, whose search for self-transcendence in the great outdoors appears in moving conversation with the author’s own. This gifted artist and not-getting-any-younger exerciser comes to a soulful conclusion. The secret to superhuman strength lies not in six-pack abs, but in something much less clearly defined: facing her own non-transcendent but all-important interdependence with others.

 

 

Crying in H Mart: A Memoir by Michelle Zauner

In this exquisite story of family, food, grief, and endurance, Michelle Zauner proves herself far more than a dazzling singer, songwriter, and guitarist. With humor and heart, she tells of growing up one of the few Asian American kids at her school in Eugene, Oregon; of struggling with her mother’s particular, high expectations of her; of a painful adolescence; of treasured months spent in her grandmother’s tiny apartment in Seoul, where she and her mother would bond, late at night, over heaping plates of food.

As she grew up, moving to the East Coast for college, finding work in the restaurant industry, and performing gigs with her fledgling band–and meeting the man who would become her husband–her Koreanness began to feel ever more distant, even as she found the life she wanted to live. It was her mother’s diagnosis of terminal cancer, when Michelle was twenty-five, that forced a reckoning with her identity and brought her to reclaim the gifts of taste, language, and history her mother had given her.

 

 

World Travel: an Irreverent Guide by Anthony Bourdain and Laurie Woolever

Anthony Bourdain saw more of the world than nearly anyone. His travels took him from the hidden pockets of his hometown of New York to a tribal longhouse in Borneo, from cosmopolitan Buenos Aires, Paris, and Shanghai to Tanzania’s utter beauty and the stunning desert solitude of Oman’s Empty Quarter—and many places beyond.

In World Travel, a life of experience is collected into an entertaining, practical, fun and frank travel guide that gives readers an introduction to some of his favorite places—in his own words. Featuring essential advice on how to get there, what to eat, where to stay and, in some cases, what to avoid, World Travel provides essential context that will help readers further appreciate the reasons why Bourdain found a place enchanting and memorable.

 

 

Greenlights – Matthew McConaughey

Recently, I worked up the courage to sit down with those diaries. I found stories I experienced, lessons I learned and forgot, poems, prayers, prescriptions, beliefs about what matters, some great photographs, and a whole bunch of bumper stickers. I found a reliable theme, an approach to living that gave me more satisfaction, at the time, and still: If you know how, and when, to deal with life’s challenges—how to get relative with the inevitable—you can enjoy a state of success I call “catching greenlights.”
 
So I took a one-way ticket to the desert and wrote this book: an album, a record, a story of my life so far. This is fifty years of my sights and seens, felts and figured-outs, cools and shamefuls. Graces, truths, and beauties of brutality. Getting away withs, getting caughts, and getting wets while trying to dance between the raindrops.
 
Hopefully, it’s medicine that tastes good, a couple of aspirin instead of the infirmary, a spaceship to Mars without needing your pilot’s license, going to church without having to be born again, and laughing through the tears.
 
It’s a love letter. To life.
 
It’s also a guide to catching more greenlights—and to realizing that the yellows and reds eventually turn green too.
 

Happy Reading!!

 

Tuesday, June 8, 2021

It’s June – time for Summer Reading and a great time to read some suspense or thrillers! Here are some books new to the library and guaranteed to thrill you. A lot of these are the newest in a series, so if you haven’t read the earlier books, you can always start with the first one in the series. Follow the links to place your holds…

Our Woman in Moscow: A Novel by [Beatriz Williams]

Our Woman in Moscow by Beatriz Williams

In the autumn of 1948, Iris Digby vanishes from her London home with her American diplomat husband and their two children. The world is shocked by the family’s sensational disappearance. Were they eliminated by the Soviet intelligence service? Or have the Digbys defected to Moscow with a trove of the West’s most vital secrets?

Four years later, Ruth Macallister receives a postcard from the twin sister she hasn’t seen since their catastrophic parting in Rome in the summer of 1940, as war engulfed the continent and Iris fell desperately in love with an enigmatic United States Embassy official named Sasha Digby. Within days, Ruth is on her way to Moscow, posing as the wife of counterintelligence agent Sumner Fox in a precarious plot to extract the Digbys from behind the Iron Curtain.

But the complex truth behind Iris’s marriage defies Ruth’s understanding, and as the sisters race toward safety, a dogged Soviet KGB officer forces them to make a heartbreaking choice between two irreconcilable loyalties.

The President's Daughter: A Thriller by [James Patterson, Bill Clinton]

The President’s Daughter: A Thriller by James Patterson and Bill Clinton

A rocket ride of a thriller—the new blockbuster by President Bill Clinton and James Patterson, “the dream team” (Lee Child).
Every detail is accurate—
because one of the authors is President Bill Clinton. The drama and action never stop—
because the other author is James Patterson.
 Matthew Keating, a one-time Navy SEALand a past presidenthas always defended his family as staunchly as he has his country. Now those defenses are under attack.
 A madman abducts Keating’s teenage daughter, Melanie—turning every parent’s deepest fear into a matter of national security. As the world watches in real time, Keating embarks on a one-man special-ops mission that tests his strengths: as a leader, a warrior, and a father.

Legacy: A Novel by [Nora Roberts]

Legacy: A Novel by Nora Roberts

Adrian Rizzo was seven when she met her father for the first time. That was the day he nearly killed her—before her mother, Lina, stepped in.

Soon after, Adrian was dropped off at her grandparents’ house in Maryland, where she spent a long summer drinking lemonade, playing with dogs, making a new best friend—and developing the stirrings of a crush on her friend’s ten-year-old brother. Lina, meanwhile, traveled the country promoting her fitness brand and turning it into a billion-dollar business. There was no point in dwelling on the past.

A decade later, Adrian has created her own line of yoga and workout videos, following in Lina’s footsteps but intent on maintaining creative control. And she’s just as cool-headed and ambitious as her mother. They aren’t close, but they’re cordial—as long as neither crosses the other.

But while Lina dismisses the death threats that Adrian starts getting as a routine part of her daughter’s growing celebrity, Adrian can’t help but find the vicious rhymes unsettling. Year after year, they keep arriving—the postmarks changing, but the menacing tone the same. They continue after she returns to Maryland and becomes reacquainted with Raylan, her childhood crush, all grown up and as gorgeously green-eyed as ever. Sometimes it even seems like the terrifying messages are indeed routine, like nothing will come of them. Until the murders start, and the escalation begins…

Hidden by Fern Michaels (A Lost and Found Novel Book 1)

At first glance, few would guess that Luna and Cullan Bodman are siblings. Cullan is efficient and serious while his younger sister Luna is a free spirit. When the two launch their furniture restoration shop/café—an offshoot of the family’s longtime antique business–in an up-and-coming arts center, little do they know their unique talents may be their only defense in a matter of life and death.
 
When Luna gets a strange sense about a piece Cullan just acquired, the two find themselves uniting to solve a mystery that has far-reaching consequences—never knowing there are some who’ll stop at nothing to claim what they believe is theirs. Despite their differences, Luna and Cullan know they can rely on each other—and this time, their lives may depend on it . . .

Arctic Storm Rising: A Novel (Nick Flynn Book 1) by [Dale Brown]

Arctic Storm Rising: A Novel by Dale Brown (Nick Flynn Book 1)

After a CIA covert mission goes badly awry, U.S. Air Force intelligence officer Nicholas Flynn is exiled to guard a remote radar post along Alaska’s Arctic frontier. This dead-end assignment is designed to put his career permanently on ice, but Flynn’s not the type to fade quietly into obscurity…

As winter storms pound Alaska and northern Canada, Russian aircraft begin penetrating deep into friendly airspace. Are these rehearsals for a possible first strike, using Russia’s new long-range stealth cruise missiles? Or is some other motive driving the Kremlin to take ever-increasing risks along the hostile Arctic frontier separating two of the world’s great powers?

As Russia and the U.S. square off on the brink of all-out-war, it’s up to Nick to find the missing bomber…and prevent a potential nuclear holocaust.

 

Evan Ryder

The Kobalt Dossier by Eric Van Lustbader (#2 in the Evan Ryder series)


After thwarting the violent, international, fascist syndicate known as Nemesis, Evan Ryder returns to Washington, D.C., to find her secret division of the DOD shut down and her deceased sister’s children missing. Now the target of a cabal of American billionaires who were among Nemesis’s supporters, Evan and her former boss, Ben Butler, must learn to work together as partners – and navigate their intricate past.

Their search will take them from Istanbul to Odessa to an ancient church deep within the Carpathian Mountains of Romania. And all along the way, an unimaginable enemy stalks in the shadows, an adversary whose secretive past will upend Evan’s entire world and everything she holds dear.

Jackpot (A Teddy Fay Novel Book 5) by [Stuart Woods, Bryon Quertermous]

Jackpot by Stuart Woods (#5 in the Teddy Fay Series)

When Peter Barrington and Ben Bachetti come under threat while working at a film festival abroad, Teddy Fay is lured to the glittering city of Macau to resolve the problem. He’ll soon come to find that world of posh casinos, luxurious developments, and boundless wealth has a dark underbelly of crime and political intrigue . . . and that the biggest players behind the scenes may be far closer to home than anticipated. With international deals and private vendettas at stake, the villains behind the plot aren’t about to let Teddy stand in their way. What they don’t know is that this seemingly harmless film producer has more than a few tricks up his sleeve.

The Saboteurs: An Isaac Bell Adventure by Clive Cussler (#12 in the Isaac Bell Series)  

Detective Isaac Bell’s wife has said that he is always in the wrong place at the right time. This is certainly the case when Bell thwarts the assassination of a U.S. Senator shortly after meeting the man. This heroic rescue is just the start of the mystery for Bell, who suspects that the would-be assassins have a much larger and more dangerous agenda–one involving the nearly-constructed Panama Canal. While the senator supports the building of the canal, there are many, including a local Panamanian insurgency known as the Red Vipers, who never want to see its completion.

With millions of dollars and the fates of two nations at stake, Bell heads to Panama to find answers. After a deadly bombing at the canal’s construction site, he is determined to stop the insurgents–or whoever is funding them–before they can attack again.

Unfinished Business (Ali Reynolds Series Book 16) by [J.A. Jance]

Unfinished Business by JA Jance (#16 in the Ali Reynolds series)

In this heart-pounding and sharply written thriller from J.A. Jance, the “grand master of the genre” (The Providence Journal), Ali Reynolds’s personal life is thrown into turmoil just as two men show up on the scene—a former employee of her husband’s who has just been released from prison and a serial killer who sets his sights a little too close to home.

Castle Shade: A novel of suspense featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes by [Laurie R. King]

Castle Shade: A Novel of Suspense Featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes by Laurie R King (#17 in the Mary Russell Series)

When Queen Marie calls, Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes are as dubious as they are reluctant. But a young girl is involved, and a beautiful queen. Surely it won’t take long to shine light on this unlikely case of what would seem to be strigoi?

Or, as they are known in the West . . . vampires.

The Bullet (Eve Duncan Book 27) by [Iris Johansen]

The Bullet by Iris Johansen (#27 in the Eve Duncan series)

Diane Connors is a dedicated doctor with the world’s biggest secret, a discovery that could have shocking global ramifications.  But while conducting private research trials, word has gotten out. The wrong people have heard the news and now want to hide Diane’s achievement for their own ends.

With nowhere else to turn, Diane finds herself on the doorstep of the last man she wants to ask for help: her ex-husband, Joe Quinn. Joe has remarried, and he and his wife, Eve Duncan, seem blissfully happy in their quiet, rural life until they are faced with the challenge of risking it all—even their marriage itself—for the greater good …

The Unforgiven (Krewe of Hunters Book 33) by [Heather Graham]

The Unforgiven by Heather Graham (#33 in the Krewe of Hunters Series)

An uncertain future A tragic past.

Twelve years after the grisly murder of her parents, Kaitlyn Delaney has finally found peace. She has friends, a good job, a place to call home and a new life to live. But then a shadow creeps in from Katie’s past, reminding her that she will never completely escape its terrifying grip.

When private investigator Dan Oliver is called to the scene of a gruesome crime in New Orleans, he can’t help but hear echoes of the Delaney case, the unsolved murder that made him leave law enforcement. As he digs deeper, he unearths more chilling similarities—including mysterious letters connecting the killer to a string of murders that terrorized the Big Easy in 1919.

Happy Suspenseful Reading!